Report of the Annual Meeting, 1–2. number

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page ix - The Officers and Members of the Councils, or Managing Committees, of Philosophical Institutions shall be entitled, in like manner, to become Members of the Association. All Members of a Philosophical Institution recommended by its Council or Managing Committee shall be entitled, in like manner, to become Members of the Association. Persons not belonging to such Institutions shall be elected by the General Committee or Council, to become...
Page 6 - The Author of any paper or communication shall be at liberty to reserve his right of property therein. ACCOUNTS. The Accounts of the Association shall be audited annually, by Auditors appointed by the Meeting.
Page ix - Committee two years in advance ; and the arrangements for it shall be entrusted to the Officers of the Association. General Committee. The General Committee shall sit during the week of the Meeting, or longer, to transact the business of the Association. It shall consist of the following persons : — CLASS...
Page ix - Its objects are— to give a stronger impulse, and a more systematic direction to scientific enquiry— to promote the intercourse of those who cultivate Science in different parts of the British Empire with one another, and with Foreign Philosophers — to obtain a more general attention to the objects of Science, and a removal of any disadvantages of a public kind which impede its progress.
Page 41 - To give a stronger impulse and a more systematic direction to scientific inquiry, — to promote the intercourse of those who cultivate Science in different parts of the British Empire, with one another, and with foreign philosophers, — to obtain a more general attention to the objects of Science, and a removal of any disadvantages of a public kind which impede its progress.
Page 64 - In other instances, he was influenced by theoretical views of so flimsy a texture that they were dispersed by the first appeal to experiment. "These mistakes," he observes, "it was in my power to have concealed; but I was determined to show how little mystery there is in the business of experimental philosophy; and with how little sagacity, discoveries, which some persons are pleased to consider great and wonderful, have been made.
Page 22 - Empire with one another and with foreign philosophers, and to obtain a greater degree of national attention to the objects of science, and a removal of any disadvantages of a public nature which impede its progress.
Page 314 - This singular result opened a wide field of inquiry to philosophers : and the successive labours of Malus, Arago, Biot, Fresnel, and Cauchy, in France; Seebeck and Mitscherlich, in Germany; and Young, Herschel, and Airy, in England — present a train of research
Page 66 - ... 278), Dr. Priestley has anticipated the idea of Dr. Arnott and Sir JFW Herschel, that electricity, acting on the brain and nerves, may excite muscular action. Dr. Henry, in the memoir already quoted, has remarked, that facts are to be met with in various parts of Dr. Priestley's works that might have given him a hint of the law, since unfolded by the sagacity of M. Gay-Lussac, "that gaseous substances combine in definite volumes.
Page 269 - A thick glass, though as much or more permeable to light than a thin glass of worse quality, allows a much smaller quantity of radiant heat to pass.

Bibliographic information