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From HON. SIMON GREENLEAF, LL.D.,
Author of "Greenleaf on Evidence," &c., and Professor of Law in Harvard University, Cambridge.

Bostox, August, 1851. GENTLEMEN:—I have received the volumes of the Institutes of Judge Bouvier, which he had the kindness to send me, through you.

In this work the learned author has taken the middle course, not occupied, that I know of, by any preceding American writer,-treating his subject with a degree of learning, compactness, precision of statement, and accuracy of definition, that cannot fail, I think, of ren. dering it highly acceptable to the profession.

Judge Bouvier is so well known to the profession, that any commendation of his Institutes from me would be superfluous; but it will give me great pleasure to be instrumental in making them known whenever opportunity may occur.

With sincere thanks for your kind attention, I beg to remain your much obliged and obedient servant,

S. GREENLEAF. Messrs. CHILDS & PETERSON.

The following extract is from a letter received by the late Judge Bouvier from the Hon. Simon Greenleaf :

"I

you to accept my hearty thanks for the volumes of your Institutes, which I yesterday received. I have rapidly looked them over, plunging into one or two titles in which my present studies are most occupied, and am quite delighted with the work. It will prove a very valuable and acceptable addition to our legal literature."

From HON. JOHN MCLEAN,
One of the Associate Judges of the Supreme Court of the United States.

CINCINNATI, October 3, 1851. GENTLEMEN :-I am under very great obligations to you for Julge Bouvier's Institutes of American Law. The classification of the topics explained appears to me to be lucid and natural; and I was struck with the excellent method of the work. The plan seems not to have been copied from any one, but it has more of the simplicity and manner of the civillaw writers than is found in the elementary treatises of the common law. The principles of law are succinctly and clearly stated and illustrated, and the notes appended are judiciously selected, without being crowded, as they are in many of our modern publications.

I know of no work which shows so much research, and which embodies 80 generally the clementary principles of American law, as the Institutes of Judge Bouvier. His name is most favorably known to the profession by his previous works; and I am greatly mistaken if his Institutes shall not add to his high reputation as an able and learned law-writer. The Institutes ought not only to be found in the hands of every student of law, but on the shelf of every lawyer.

With great respect, your obliged and obedient servant, Messrs. CHILDS & PETERSON.

JOHN MCLEAN

From HON. JOHN CATRON,
One of the Associate Judges of the Supreme Court of the United States.

NASHVILLE, Nov. 12, 1852. GENTLEMEN :-On reaching home in August I found a copy of Bouvier's Institutes of American Law, forwarded to me by you last November. I have examined the work, according to your request, and feel prepared to recommend it as one of high merit. The author has succeeded in presenting the laws of England generally in force throughout the United States, as they stand modified by strictly American law, in a manner more lucid, brief, and simple than will be found in any other general treatise on our law. The usual error of overloading the work with words and useless discussions has been avoided with rare success : this in itself is a great merit. I think Judge Bouvier's work should be read by every law-student next after Blackstone's Commentaries. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. CATRON. Messrs. Childs & PETERSON.

From HON. J. K. KANE,
Judge of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

RENSSELAER, NEAR PHILADELPHIA, October 10, 1851. I have devoted some time to an examination of Judge Bouvier's Institutes. I have traced bis analysis of the law through its several subdivisions, and have also read several titles of the text, and I am satisfied that the work is worthy of its author's well-established repuia tion, and that it must occupy a place in every well-stocked professional library. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. K. KANE

Bourier's Law Dictionary.
LA W DICTIONARY,

ADAPTED TO THE

CONSTITUTION AND LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

AND OF THE

SEVERAL STATES OF THE AMERICAN UNION: WITH REFERENCE TO THE CIVIL AND OTHER SYSTEMS OF FOREIGN LAW.

BY JOHN BOUVIER. New Edition, revised, enlarged, and greatly improved. 2 volumes, royal octavo.

Best Law Binding. Price, $10. Bouvier's Law Dictionary has been before the profession since the year 1839, and hay passed through eight large editions. This single fact is conclusive evidence of its merit. Indeed, the work has now become so well known, that it is unnecessary to make any extended remark concerning it. Those who have not yet examined it may, however, be assured that it is not merely a verbal Dictionary, but rather a condensed Encyclopedia of legal subjects. The articles contained in it are not mere definitions of words, but compact expositions of doctrines as they range themselves under the different titles. Nor are these espositions merely of an elementary character for the instruction of students; but they contain references to late authorities, so that the practitioner will not only find here the doctrine of the law stated as an abstract proposition, but he will find its qualifications, exceptions, and modifications referred to, with a copious citation of the cases which fortify the text. We are furnished, in fact, with a complete manual of the general body of the law, which may be handily used in preparation for trial or for argument, and which may take the place of a shelf of elementary treatises.

This work is, in truth, as its title claims for it, "adapted to the Constitution and laws of the United States of America, and of the several States of the American Union.” It is not, therefore, a mere reproduction of the old dictionaries, but is essentially new and original, exhibiting the present state of the law in our own country, as well as containing an exposition of the terms which have been adopted from the Civil Law and from other systens of Foreign Law.

The publishers have incorporated into the successive editions of the work such improvements as seemed necessary for its increased usefulness; and the ninth edition, now offered to the public, has been in many respects revised, enlarged, and greatly improved. No paing have been spared to render the Law Dictionary still more worthy of the commendations it has received from Story, Kent, Greenleaf, Taney, McLean, Curtis, Nelson, Parsons, and others.

From JOSEPH STORY, LL.D.

CAMBRIDGE, September 28, 1839. DEAR SIR: I have the pleasure to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 19th instant. The sheets of your Law Dictionary, which you had the goodness to send to me, I received at the same time. I have examined them with considerable care, and do not hesitate to say that the work will be a very important and most useful addition to our judicial literature. It supplies a defect in our libraries, where the small Dictionaries are 80 brief as to convey little information of an accurate nature to students, and the large ones are rather compendiums of the law than explanatory statements of terms: yours has the · great advantage of an intermediate character. It defines terms, and occasionally explains subjects, so as to furnish students at once the means and the outlines of knowledge. I will feel myself greatly honored by the dedication of the work to me, although I am fully sensible that there are many other gentlemen who have far better claims to such a distinction than myself. Believe me, dear sir, with the highest respect, truly your obliged friend, The Honorable JUDGE BOUVIER.

JOSEPH STORY.

CAMBRIDGE, January 7, 1840. MY DEAR SIR:-I had the pleasure a few days ago to receive the second volume of your Law Dictionary, for which I return you.my very sincere thanks. The opinion formed of its great merit, in examining the sheets which I formerly received of the first volume, is fully confirmed by an examination of the second. It is, indeed, a most truly valuable work. I am gratified in having my name connected with your enterprise, and I trust you will receive from a liberal profession that full approbation and compensation which are so justly due to auch useful lahors. Professor Greenleaf and myself shall recommend it to the attention of flour law-students. With the highest respect, truly your obliged friend, The Honorable JUDGE BOUVIER.

JOSEPH STORY.

From CHANCELLOR KENT.

New York, November 20, 1839 Dear Sir:-I have the pleasure to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 30th ull., accompanied with your Law Dictionary, and for which I sincerely thank you.

I have not been insensible of the value of the gift, for I have run over almost every article in it, and beg leave to add that I have been deeply impressed with the evidences throughout the volumes of the industry, skill, learning, and judgment with which the work has been compiled. I have found it very instructive, and shall not fail to recommend its utility to the student whenever a due opportunity occurs.

With my best wishes for your health, and for perseverance in your labors for the honor of the profession, I am, respectfully and truly, yours,

JAMES KENT. Hon. John BOUVIER.

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From HON. SIMON GREENLEAF.

CAMBRIDGE, December 17, 1839. DEAR SIB :-Your letter of 30th October, with the accompanying first volume of your Law Dictionary, did not reach me till this day. The second volume-from a source till now unknown-was received a few days ago. I had previously looked over those belonging to Mr. Justice Story. I pray you, dear sir, to accept my unfeigned thanks, not only for the books, which will be highly prized, but for having made so valuable an addition to our professional apparatus. For extent of research, clearness of definitions and illustration, variety of matter, and exactness of learning, it is not surpassed by any in use, and, on every account, I think it preferable to them all.

I am, dear sir, with sincere respect, your obedient servant, Hon. J. BOUVIER.

SIMON GREENLEAF.

From HON. BENJ. ROBBINS CURTIS,
One of the Associate Judges of the Supreme Court of the United States.

Boston, April 14, 1853. Messrs. Childs & PETERSON,—GENTLEMEN :-I received the copy of Bouvier's Law Dictionary, which you did me the honor to send to me. I have examined it with some care, and have pleasure in expressing my opinion that it is a work of much importance to students, and very useful to practitioners of the law. Compared with any other similar work which has fallen under my notice, I should not hesitate to give it a decided preference, as being far more full and comprehensive than any other, and I have seen no reason to question its accuracy With much respect, I am your obedient servant,

B. R. CURTIS.

From HON. ROGER B. TANEY,
Chief Justice of the United States,

BALTIMORE, May 11, 1853. GENTLEMEN :-Unavoidable circumstances have prevented me from acknowledging sooner the receipt of a copy of the late Judge Bouvier's Law Dictionary.

I have looked into the work with attention, and think it superior, as a Law Dictionary, to any other work of that character which I have had an opportunity of examining. The number of beads in which it is arranged, and the cases cited to support and illustrate the principles stated, adds much to its value. It is a very convenient book to refer to, especially when one is pressed for time.

I am glad to hear that his Institutes of American Law have been so successful. They certainly deserve it. With great respect, I am, dear sirs, your obedient servant, Messrs ChildS & PETERSON.

R. B. TANEY.

From HON. JOHN MCLEAN,

One of the Associate Judges of the Supreme Court of the United States. Bonvier's Law Dictionary is a work so well known to the profession, and so highly appreciated, that no commendation of it is necessary. It is an elaborate production, unequalled by any other of the kind in this country or in England. I have before me the fourth edi. tion, revised, improved, and greatly enlarged, published in 1852. This edition is nearly one-third larger than the preceding one. The greater part of the matter for this edition was prepared by the distinguished author before his lamented decease in 1851. Some additions have since been made, and several errors corrected, on a careful revision of the for-ner editions, by two members of the bar, so that the present edition is not only the largest but the roost valuable.

Vc lauryer's library is complete without this valuable work. Its place cannot be supplied by any other publication with which I am acquainted. CINCINNATI, May 2, 1853.

JOHN MCLEAN,

From HON. SIMON GREENLEAF, LL.D.,
Author of “Greenleaf on Evidence,” &c., and Professor of Law in Harvard University.

CAMBRIDGE, April 6, 1858. Messrs. Childs & Peterson, — DEAR SIRS :- I return my grateful acknowledgments for the copy of the fourth edition of Judge Bouvier's Law Dictionary, which you have done me the honor to present. I was not aware that the work had passed through so many editions, though the reputation of the author as a learned and accurate lawyer would well have just:fiel such an expectation. I regard it as a reliable work of greut merit, and am happy to observe that the present edition is so much enlarged and improved, particularly in the article of law marims, in which it is greatly enriched. I remain, dear sirs, your much obliged and obedient servant,

SIMON GREENLEAF. From THEODORE W. DWIGHT, LL.D.,

Professor of Law in Columbia College, N. Y. COLUMPIA COLLEGE Law School, 37 Lafayette Place, New York, Nov. 19, 1859. Massrs. Childs & PETERSON,-GENTLEMEN :-- Please accept my thanks for a copy of the dioth elition of Bouvier's Law Dictionary. I have known the value of this work for many years, and bave for a long period stated to my students that it was one of the first works to be purchased for their libraries. I not only regard the work as greatly useful to strict students of the law, but as very valuable for general scholars. It should be placed in any well-selected private library by the side of Blackstone's Commentaries. I think that this elition is greatly superior even to the excellent original work of Judge Bouvier. I shall bereafter commend this Dictionary more warmly than ever before.

THEODORE W. DWIGHT.
From HON. HENRY DUTTON, LL.D.,
Kent Professor of Law in Yale College.

YALE LAW SCHOOL, NEW HAVEN, Nov. 14, 1859. Messrs. Childs & PETERSON, --GENTLEMEN :

:-A Law Dictionary is almost indispensable to every person who is commencing the study of law.

Bouvier's Law Dictionary, recently published by you, will not only supply this want, but will prove a great convenience to a practitioner in any part of the United States.

As an expounder of law terms and phrases, it has no superior, while it at the same time furnishes numerous references to recent cases, and contains valuable information, not easily obtainable elsewhere, regarding many of the peculiar laws of particular States. I shall take great pleasure in recommending it.

HENRY DUTTON. From AMOS DEAN, LL.D.,

Professor of Law in the University of Albany. I have always recommended it to our classes as the best Law Dictionary they could obtain, end in addition have advised them to procure a Law Dictionary and always keep it by thom during their course of study.- Ezract from a letter to the Publishers, dated Nov. 2, 1859.

From HON. THEOPHILUS PARSONS, LL.D.,

The eminent law writer, and Professor of Law in Harvard University, Cambridge. Of Bouvier's Law Dictionary I know the merit. I recommend it to the young men of my school as one of the books which should be in even a very small library. I have no doubt They buy a large number annually.Extract from a Letter to the Publishers, May, 1858.

" BOUVIER's Law DICTIONARY is the best book of the kind in use for the American lawyer. It contains sufficient reference to English and foreign law, with a very full synopsis of such mortions of American jurisprudence as require elucidation. In the second edition, the author ecast many of the titles, and added about a thousand new ones. By means of correspondence with the members of the bar in different States, and by a careful examination of local reatises, the author has produced not only a good American Law Dictionary, but one sufi ciently local for all practical purposes.”—Marvin's Legal Bibliography, p. 138.

"ALTHOUGH Judge BOUVIER was by birth a Frenchman, and, according to our arrange ment, should be ranked among foreign writers in America, we deem it not improper, for several reasons, to introduce him here. He went to the United States at an early age, but was not at first designed for the law. His mind, however, was peculiarly adapted to the legal profession, and he became an eminent judge. His two books—the Institutes of Americon Law, and Dictionary of Law-are among the best works of their kind, and are so considered in Europe.

The celebrated German jurist, Mittermaier, recommends them to European lawyers as the books they will have to look up to as the great authorities on American practice; and their wide circulation in the United States, and extensive use there, give them a position equal to the works of the ablest American jurists, among whom Judgo Bouvier may justly be classed."— Trübner's Bibliographical Guide to American Literature, p. lxii., London, 1859, 8vo.

ty• Bourier's Institutes, Law Dictionary, or Sharewood's Blackstone, will be forwarded wany portion of the United States, free or expense, on receipt of the published price.

Gashburn on Easements.

A TREATISE ON THE AMERICAN LAW OF EASEMENTS AND SERVITUDES.

BY EMORY WASHBURN, LL.D.,

> BC SSEY PROFESSOR OF LAW IN HARVARD UNIVERSITY, AUTHOR OF A TREATISE ON THE

AMERICAN LAW OF REAL PROPERTY.

Complete in 1 vol. octavo, pages xxvii.-810. Price, $6.00.

From Hon. WILLIAM CURTIS NOYES,

The eminent New-York Lawyer. Washburn's Law of Easements was too important a work for a hasty examination, and I therefore reserved its careful consideration for a part of my summer vacation; and, having now mastered its contents and made myself familiar with its plan and scope, I am glad to be able to say that in comprehensiveness and accuracy it is without a rival, and that none of the published works on the same or kindred subjects can compare with it in research or ability. Not the least of its merits is, that it contains the whole American Law in regard to Servitudes, and that all the numerous cases cited are stated briefly, but with such correctness as to render a reference to the original reports seldom necessary.

It is a trite remark that certain books are essential to the library of every lawyer, but it must be said most emphatically of this, that it is absolutely necessary to the lawyer himself; as without an intimate acquaintance with its contents, he would be ignorant of no inconsiderable part of the American Law of Easements.

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From the AMERICAN LAW REGISTER, June, 1863, by Hon. Isaac

F. Redfield, LL.D. This is a book much needed by the profession in this country. We bave examined portions of the volume with considerable care, and, so far as we have been able to determine, the subjects discussed are considered in all their bearings, and the cases fully presented, which latter circumstance we esteem a great merit in a recent law-book. We feel confident the profession will find this a valuable aid and a reliable guide in the preparation of cases. From the BOSTON LAW REPORTER, May, 1863, by F. F. Heard, Esq.

In England, few books have held such a high position as Gale's masterly Treatise on the Law of Easements. But, notwithstanding the high character of this Treatise, it is exclusively English. In the American Reports there are hundreds of cases on the subject, many of which, for keen discussion and exhaustive research, are not inferior to the English. A want therefore existed for a treatise in which the American and English cases might be found collected and stated in connection. This want Professor Washburn's book well supplies.

We have subjected the sheets of this volume to a rigid scrutiny as they were passing through the press, and have risen from their perusal under a strong conviction of the author's industry and accuracy. “He has had the happiness," to quote from old Fuller, "to reconcile brevity with clearness, qualities of great distance in other authors."

I Treatise on the Law of Subrogation,

WITH COPIOUS REFERENCES TO THE ROMAN AND CONTINENTAL LAW. By S. F. DIXON, OF CAMBRIDGE, MASS.

1 vol. octavo.
From Hon. JUDGE SHARSWOOD,

litor of Sharswood's Blackstone, etc. The “ Treatise on the Law I Subrogation, with Full References to the Civil Law, hy S. F. Dixon," is one of the abl-st and most philosophical essays which the press of late years has given to the profession. It traces the doctrine of Subrogation to the Roman law, its original fountain, compares that law with the rules adopted in English and American jurisprudence, and exhibits the application of those rules in the great variety of circumstances constantly arising in daily transaction's. Hence it is a work of constant recurrence to the practioner.

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