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Colonel Tourtellotte regrets exceedingly that he will not be able to attend the twenty-second reunion of the Society of the Army of the Tennessee.

DEAR SIR:-1 regret to say I cannot come and experience all the good things that will belong to the approaching meeting of the Society, including the abundant hospitality of the place of meeting, but I will then be in our principal term of court, engaged in “ my harvest,” and must forego it all.

Truly, etc.,

H. VAN Sellar,

Once Lieutenant-Colonel, etc. PARIS, ILL., September 6, 1889.

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., August 9, 1889. MY DEAR Matrox:- I shall not be able to attend the twenty-second reunion of the Army of the Tennessee. Wishing you a successful reunion and a good time, I remain,

Your friend,

FRED. WELKER,

- POLAND SPRINGS, ME., September 12, 1889. DEAR Sır:-I am sorry not to be able to be with you. Many thanks for. your kind invitation, and hope you will have a good time.

H. C. WERMOTH.

September 3, 1889. Dear CAPTAIN:- I regret that my absence from America will prevent my being with you.

E. F. Winslow,

I regret more than I can find words to express, that I am laid up temporarily and cannot attend the reunion.

JAMES H. WILSON.

Kansas City, Mo., September 11, 1889. DEAR CAPTAIN:-I very much regret that my engagements will prevent my presence at the twenty-second reunion. My best wishes goes with this.

Fraternally,

En. H. WEBSTER.

DULUTH, MINN., September 4, 1889. CAPTAIN:

DEAR SIR:-I regret that I shall not be able to attend the twenty-second reunion of the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, at Cincinnati, on the 25th and 26th inst.

Hoping the meeting may be as pleasant and successful as usual, I am,

Very respectfully,

Geo. E. WELLES,
Late Colonel 68th 0. V. V. Infantry and Brevet Brigadier-General.

Elgin, Ills., September 11, 1889. CAPTAIN A. H. Mattox,

Secretary, Cincinnati, Ohio: DEAR COMRADE:- A few days ago I wrote you that I should be present at our twenty-second reunion. Now I am compelled to retract and inform you that I cannot.

Old comrades in Carroll county, of this State, hold a county reunion on the 25th inst., and urgently insist I shall deliver the address; and I have been persuaded to promise to do so, by the plea that duty should be done rather than pleasure enjoyed. I had promised myself this one very greatly-desired pleasure, and yield it with a reluctance I cannot express.

Very truly yours,

JOHN S. Wilcox.

Port TowNSEND, WASH. Ter., September 16, 1889. GENERAL A. HICKENLOOPER,

Corresponding Secretary, Society of the Army of the Tennessee, Cin.

cinnati, Ohio: MY DEAR GENERAL:—I am in receipt of notice of the time and place for the annual reunion of the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, and regret more than I can express my inability to meet with you. I know you will have a good time, and I shall be with you in spirit though absent in person.

I hand you $5.00 in payment of my dues, and send my kindest regard to each of my old comrades.

Truly yours,

Oliver Wood,
Late Brevet Brigadier-General U. S. Vols.

GENEVA, SWITZERLAND, September 25, 1889. MY DEAR HOSEA:—The kind invitation to attend the twenty-second reunion of the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, to be held in Cincinnati, Ohio, September 25th and 26th, reached me to-day.

From the shores of the most beautiful of the Swiss lakes, within sight of its loftiest mountain, Mont Blanc, and from the hospitable bosom of our “little sister” on this side of the Atlantic, I write my thanks for the kind invitation, as also to wish the meeting may be a complete success and a source of happiness to all comrades who may attend it.

I beg of you the favor to communicate my thanks to the Society of the

Army of the Tennessee, among whose members I have so many cherished comrades. Most truly your friend and comrade,

Th: J. Wood.

ANNA, Ills., August 4, 1889. GENERAL A. HICKENLOOPER,

Corresponding Secretary, Cincinnati, Ohio: DEAR SIR:-I am in receipt of the circular with reference to the meeting of the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, on September 25th.

I regret that I shall not be able to attend the meeting, owing to urgent duties at home and the meeting of our Southern Illinois Soldiers' Association, which meets on the same date, at Belleville.

If you will kindly inform me of the amount of my dues to the Society, I will remit the same at once, for whether I am able to attend the meetings regularly or not, I wish to die a member of the Army of the Tennessee.

Very truly,

H. WARDNER.

Following which report, General Hickenlooper explained in response to members that he was only reporting for sums sent himself; not for sums sent General Raum, the chairman of the Logan Monument Committee; and at the request of members corrected two mistakes in names in the list of contributions.

Lieutenant Oates:-In this connection let me say that I know of several members of the Army of the Tennessee who would gladly contribute to that fund. I for one, had lost sight of it, being absent from home; but if the proper officer could be found, I will gladly contribute and I think there are others.

The President:—We are now reading the report of the Corresponding Secretary. A portion of the collections have happened to pass through his hands; but the great majority of the collections have gone to the committee of which General Raum is chairman. That committee must have a treasurer, and if there is such a treasurer here on the floor, I would be glad if he would give his name; who is treasurer of that committee?

General Hickenlooper:-General Raum is the chairman, and a check of $3.00 to $300.00 if sent to him will be certainly acknowledged, I promise that.

I have also received, Mr. President, a poem, written by William H. Smith, of St. Clair, Michigan, which he desires to

present to the Army of the Tennessee. I don't know what disposition you would make of it, unless you refer it to the officers' committee.

The President:—We can't affort to print everything. We have got our own poem, and we can't encourage too much. [Laughter.] But the Society has the matter in hand; if they are willing to pay for the printing of the poem sent us, it will be adopted as part of the Corresponding Secretary's report.

Colonel Jacobson:-Allow me to suggest that it be referred to Captain Mattox, chairman of the printing committee.

The motion was carried. General Hickenlooper here read an invitation from President Kilgour, of the Consolidated Street Railroad Company, extending the use of the lines to the members of the Army of the Tennessee.

The President:—Gentlemen, you have heard the report of our Corresponding Secretary; if there be no objection, and I hear none, it will stand approved and be printed as usual.

Now, gentlemen, the only other committees are the special committees. There is a special committee appointed to report on permanent location of headquarters for the Army of the Ten. nessee, and it so happens that that committee is composed of the very gentlemen now on the stand. Colonel Dayton says he is ready to report. You may report, Colonel Dayton, and reduce to writing afterwards.

Colonel Dayton:

The subject of headquarters of the Society and a place for holding the meetings came before the Society at our last meeting and was fully discussed, resulting in the appointment of a committee on the question of headquarters in Cincinnati, composed of myself, General Hickenlooper and General Force to investigate and report. We have now to report that we are offered by the commandery of the Loyal Legion of Ohio, the joint use or use of one of their rooms at an annual rent of one hundred dollars. The committee was unable to agree upon, and therefore does not make any recommendation. Respectfully submitted in behalf of the committee.

COLONEL DAYTON,
GENERAL HICKENLOOPER,

GENERAL FORCE. Colonel Dawes:—The Loyal Legion offers the use of me.. rooms free of charge, and clerical service, etc., for $100 a vear, or

such amount as the Society of the Army of the Tennessee think would be proper to pay.

General Hickenlooper:- Mr. President and gentlemen, this matter I deem to be one worthy of our serious thought. With this idea in view, and expressing my own personal views, they are these: That the Society first, should find a permanent abiding place; and secondly, that that place is Chicago.

There are, comparing the city of Cincinnati with Chicago, members of the Army of the Tennessee not to exceed six or eight in Cincinnati; General Force, as he has truly said, has left the city; Colonel Dayton's health has been such that he is unable to take a great deal of interest in the Society, for he is unable to do it; not because of any disposition on his part; and it leaves few to work and few interested in the Army of the Tennessee, in the city of Cincinnati. Whereas in Chicago, there are I suppose seventy-five members, that are coming, active, working men, and as good soldiers, and as interested in the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, as there are in the United States. I feel that the coming prosperity of the Society depends in a great measure on following the course I have indicated; that if any permanent location is sought for, I think it ought to be in Chicago and not Cincinnati.

Colonel Jacobson:- If I may arrogate to myself the right to speak for any member or members from Chicago, and I have seen quite a number this morning (I came over with thirty of the seventy-five yesterday, and we talked this matter over very freely) and I would like to say a few words on this subject, and that is that any change from Cincinnati would involve the appointment of new officers, to which we are one and all opposed. [Applause.] We are one and all in favor of the present officers holding their positions for years and years to come; until they have passed away, to the land that is beyond our control. We from Chicago, if I correctly understand the sentiment of the men who are here and the men who cannot be here, are not in favor of moving the headquarters of this Society to Chicago. We are in favor of keeping it where it is; under the efficient leadership which we have enjoyed here; and when I say efficient leadership, I include all the officers to whom we are grateful for their efforts and to whom we are bound by ties of comradeship and affection. I would look upon it as a calamity for us to move our headquarters from Cincinnati, where it has been so long and where we ever

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