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G Gaz 1893

FACTORY ACCOUNTS

THEIR PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE

104947
A Handbook for Accountants and Manufacturers

WITH APPENDICES ON

THE NOMENCLATURE OF MACHINE DETAILS; THE INCOME
TAX ACTS; THE RATING OF FACTORIES; FIRE AND
BOILER INSURANCE; THE FACTORY AND

WORKSHOP ACTS, ETC.

INCLUDING ALSO

A GLOSSARY OF TERMS AND A LARGE NUMBER OF

SPECIMEN RULINGS

BY

EMILE GARCKE AND J. M. FELLS

“The counting-house of an accomplished merchant is a school of method
wherein the great science may be learned of ranging particulars under
generals, of bringing the different parts of a transaction together, and of
showing at one view a long series of dealing and exchange."

DR. JOHNSON, in Preface to Rolt's Dictionary of Commerce."

Fourth Edition, Revised and Enlarged

Capio Lumen

LONDON
CROSBY LOCKWOOD AND SON
7, STATIONERS' HALL COURT, LUDGATE HILL

1893
(All rights reserved]

LONDON: PRINTED BY J. S. VIRTUE AND CO., LIMITED,

CITY ROAD.

PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION.

THIS work is, we believe, the first attempt to place before English readers a systematised statement of the principles regulating Factory Accounts; and of the methods by which those principles can be put into practice and made to serve important purposes in the economy of manufacture.

It is not necessary to convince men of business of the advantages and importance of correct mercantile bookkeeping; but as regards their factories and warehouses they are for the most part content to accept accounts which are not capable of scientific verification. Such accounts can only be regarded as memoranda of transactions.

Our aim has been to show not only that as great a degree of accuracy can be attained in factory bookkeeping as in commercial accounts, but that the books of a manufacturing business can scarcely be said to be complete and reliable unless they are supplemented by, and to a large extent based upon, the accounts special to a factory.

The principles of Factory Accounts do not differ in the main from those general rules on which all sound book-keeping is based, and we have but applied fundamental axioms to the practice of an important and extending branch of industrial accounts; and with the view of rendering the book of special utility to Accountants we have not dealt with the principles and practice of accounts in so far as they apply merely to elementary and commercial book-keeping, as to do so would, in

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