Otsing Pildid Maps YouTube Uudised Gmail Drive Kalender
Logi sisse
Raamatud Books
" I may be allowed to personify the natural preservation or survival of the fittest, cares nothing for appearances, except in so far as they are useful to any being. She can act on every internal organ, on every shade of constitutional difference, on the... "
The Darwinian Theory of the Transmutation of Species - Page 136
by Robert Mackenzie Beverley - 1867 - 386 lehte
Full view - About this book

Evolution and Social Life

T. Ingold - 1986 - 431 lehte
...— select in person (Darwin 1872:60; see Barnett 1983:38). 'Man', he continues in the same passage, 'selects only for his own good; Nature only for that of the being which she tends.' In other words, there is no plan in nature beyond those uniquely embodied in each and every one of...
Limited preview - About this book

The Victorian Age in Prose

Alan W. Bellringer, C. B. Jones - 1988 - 241 lehte
...Nature cares nothing for appearances, except in so far as they may be useful to any being. She can act on every internal organ, on every shade of constitutional...which she tends. Every selected character is fully exercised by her; and the being is placed under well-suited conditions of life. Man keeps the natives...
Limited preview - About this book

Biology and Freedom: An Essay on the Implications of Human Ethology

S. A. Barnett, Samuel Anthony Barnett - 1988 - 376 lehte
...if I may be allowed to personify the natural preservation or survival of the fittest, . . . can act on every internal organ, on every shade of constitutional...Nature only for that of the being which she tends. But he also writes: It has been said that I speak of natural selection as an active power or Deity;...
Limited preview - About this book

History and Evolution

Matthew H. Nitecki, Doris V. Nitecki - 1992 - 269 lehte
...nature cares nothing for appearances, except in so far as they may be useful to any being. She can act on every internal organ, on every shade of constitutional...Nature only for that of the being which she tends ... It may be said that natural selection is daily and hourly scrutinising, throughout the world, every...
Limited preview - About this book

The Meaning of Evolution: The Morphological Construction and Ideological ...

Robert J. Richards - 2009 - 222 lehte
...natural selection altruistically looked to the welfare of the creatures selected. As Darwin put it: "Man selects only for his own good; Nature only for that of the being which she tends." 53 He concluded that natural selection therefore insured progressive evolution: "as natural selection...
Limited preview - About this book

“The” Language of Science: A Study of the Relationship Between Literature ...

Ilse Nina Bulhof - 1992 - 207 lehte
...her: Nature (...) cares nothing for appearances.(90) Nature works on the animal's insides: She can act on every internal organ, on every shade of constitutional difference, on the whole machinery of life.(9o) She has been doing so continuously, century after century. Compared with the working of nature,...
Limited preview - About this book

The New Genesis: Theology and the Genetic Revolution

Ronald Cole-Turner - 1993 - 127 lehte
...improper extension of the metaphor) nature selects intentionally for progress. Darwin himself could write, "Man selects only for his own good; Nature only for that of the being which she tends" (1968 [1859], p. 132). If taken literally, the metaphor of "natural selection" is dangerously misleading....
Limited preview - About this book

The Spiritual Quest: Transcendence in Myth, Religion, and Science

Robert M. Torrance - 1994 - 330 lehte
...reveals the persistence of seemingly teleological and even anthropomorphic patterns in his thought. "Man selects only for his own good; Nature only for that of the being which she tends" (132), and Nature's productions "plainly bear the stamp of far higher workmanship. ... It may be said,"...
Limited preview - About this book

The Discourses of Science

Marcello Pera - 1994 - 250 lehte
...nothing for appearances, except in so far as they may be useful to any being. She can act on everv internal organ, on every shade of constitutional difference, on the whole machinery of life. . . . Can we wonder, then, that nature's productions should be far "truer" in character than man's...
Limited preview - About this book

Charles Darwin's the Origin of Species: New Interdisciplinary Essays

David Amigoni - 1995 - 211 lehte
...power of natural selection - 'Man can act only on external and visible characters: nature ... can act on ... the whole machinery of life. Man selects only...Nature only for that of the being which she tends' - might constitute a difference of kind rather than degree, as might the much greater stretches of...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF