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" The various modes of worship, which prevailed in the Roman world, were all considered by the people, as equally true; by the philosopher, as equally false; and by the magistrate, as equally useful. "
Ecclesiastical history, a course of lectures - Page 24
by William Jones - 1831
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Paley's Evidences of Christianity epitomised, by a member of the University ...

Josiah William Smith - 1846
...public or private life (i). We may readily accept the account of the matter given by Gibbon: (8) " The various modes of worship which prevailed in the...all considered by the people as equally true; by the philosophers as equally false; and by the magistrates as equally useful." And from this statement we...
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Outlines of The Evidences of Christianity: For the Use of the Syrian College ...

Daniel Wilson - 1847 - 424 lehte
...modes of worship," as Gibbon, tersely, and perhaps with great general correctness, has put the case, "were all considered by the people as equally true;...equally false, and by the magistrate as equally useful." The people, as they were generally the first addressed, would, in all likelihood, be the first to discover...
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The Primitive Church Magazine, 4–5. köide

1847
...progressing towards that state at which Gibbon says pagan Rome had arrived, when all religion was regarded by the people as equally true, by the philosopher...equally false, and by the magistrate as equally useful. Infidelity is not the only spirit that is awake, nor is it, perhaps, the most dangerous and fatal....
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The baptist Magazine

1847
...progressing towards that state at which Gibbon says pagan Rome had arrived, when all religion was regarded by the people as equally true, by the philosopher as equally false, nud by the magistrate as equally useful. Infidelity is not the unly spirit that is awake, nor ¡s it,...
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Are not the clergy arraying themselves against Church and queen? By M.A.

M. A - 1848
...the views of an infidel who wrote only to blaspheme. " The various modes of worship (says Mr. Gibbon) which prevailed in the Roman world were all considered...equally false, and by the magistrate as equally useful." Taking this very low and unworthy view of religion, we doubt if our legislators will ever find that...
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The Christian guardian (and Church of England magazine).

1848
...the Roman world, during the decline of the Empire ; and which, to adopt Gibbon's sarcastic epigram, "were all considered by the people as equally true,...equally false, and by the magistrate as equally useful." But the history of Popery and its baneful consequences in past ages, is profitable only so far as it...
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Lectures explanatory of the Diatessaron, or the history of our Lord and ...

John David Macbride - 1848
...chapter with the remark, that " the various modes of worship that prevailed within its limits were considered by the people as equally true, by the philosopher...and by the magistrate as equally useful. And thus, he continues, toleration produced not only mutual indulgence, buteven religious concord. Such was the...
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The United Presbyterian Magazine, 2. köide

1848
...Gibbon, as existing in the later days of the Roman empire, when all systems of religion were regarded by the people as equally true, by the philosopher as equally false, and by the state as equally indifferent. It is scarcely necessary to say, that we regard such a scheme as alike...
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Connexion of Sacred and Profane History: Being a Review of the Principal ...

David Davidson - 1849
...prevailed in the Roman world, weie all considered by the people as equally true; /by the philosophei as equally false; and by the magistrate as equally...only mutual indulgence, but even religious concord." Pliny, "regardless ali!(e of the homage due to God and to the law of the empire, expelled from his...
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The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, 1. köide

Edward Gibbon - 1850
...the reflections of the enlightened, and by the habits of the superstitious, part of their subjects. The various modes of worship, which prevailed in the...magistrate, as equally useful. And thus toleration j)roduced not only mutual indulgence, but even religious concord. The superstition of the people was...
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