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" And assuredly, there is no mark of degradation about any part of its structure. It is, in fact, a fair average human skull, which might have belonged to a philosopher, or might have contained the thoughtless brains of a savage. "
Tropical Nature and Other Essays - Page 286
by Alfred Russel Wallace - 1878 - 356 lehte
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Faith and Thought, 40. köide

1908
...also says of it : " There is no mark of degradation about any part of its structure. It is, in fact, a fair average human skull, which might have belonged...or might have contained the thoughtless brains of a savage."f The earliest men in Europe were therefore as well provided with brains as are the modern...
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Journal of the Transactions of the Victoria Institute, Or ..., 40. köide

Victoria Institute (Great Britain) - 1908
...also says of it: " There is no mark of degradation about any part of its structure. It is, in fact, a fair average human skull, which might have belonged...or might have contained the thoughtless brains of a savage."f The earliest men in Europe were therefore as well provided with brains as are the modern...
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Ancient Types of Man

Sir Arthur Keith - 1912 - 151 lehte
...Ethiopian rather than to that of a European." It was of this specimen that Huxley said, " It is, in fact, a fair average human skull, which might have belonged...have contained the thoughtless brains of a savage." Thus at a very early date there was evolved a type of skull intermediate to the Galley Hill and riverbed...
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Evolution at the Bar

Philip Mauro - 1922 - 80 lehte
...as that of the much sought ' ' missing link, ' ' was conceded by Prof. Huxley to be " a fair average skull, which might have belonged to a philosopher, or might have contained the thoughtless brain of a savage." This Engis skull is supposed to be the oldest known up to now. Again quoting Prof....
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Pre-Historic Nations: Or Inquiries Concerning Some of the Great Peoples and ...

John D. Baldwin - 1988 - 414 lehte
...Place in Nature," " There is no mark of degradation about any part of its structure. It is, in fact, a fair average human skull, 'which might have belonged...have contained the thoughtless brains of a savage." Sir J. Lubbock says " it might have been that of a modern European, so far, at least, as form is concerned."...
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The Fossil Trail: How We Know what We Think We Know about Human Evolution

Ian Tattersall - 1995 - 276 lehte
...evolutionary history. These were limited to Engis (the adult specimen, which he correctly identified as a "fair average human skull, which might have belonged...have contained the thoughtless brains of a savage") and Neanderthal. He was impressed by the distinctiveness of the Neanderthal skullcap, but he concluded,...
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The Major Prose of Thomas Henry Huxley

Thomas Henry Huxley - 1997 - 366 lehte
...skulls. And assuredly, there is no mark of degradation about any part of its structure. It is, in fact, a fair average human skull, which might have belonged...contained the thoughtless brains of a savage. The case of the Neanderthal skull is very different. Under whatever aspect we view this cranium, whether...
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Infinite Tropics: An Alfred Russel Wallace Anthology

Alfred Russel Wallace - 2003 - 430 lehte
...contemporary with the mammoth and the cave bear," is yet, according to Professor Huxley, "a fair average skull, which might have belonged to a philosopher,...or might have contained the thoughtless brains of a savage."13 Of the cave men of Les Eyzies," who were undoubtedly contemporary with the reindeer in the...
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The Black Man's Place in South Africa

Peter Nielsen - 2006 - 124 lehte
...Huxley made about the ancient human skull from the cave of Engis still holds good of the brain: 'It might have belonged to a philosopher or might have contained the thoughtless mind of a savage.' That is only one side of our problem, there is another. Huxley's statement refers...
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The American Journal of Science and Arts

1876
...and such of the lower animals as most nearly approach him, is undoubtedly in the bulk and dpvelopment of his brain, as indicated by the form and capacity...are still more remarkable, being unusually large and well-formed. Dr. PrunerBey states that they surpass the average of modern European skulls in capacity,...
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