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" WHATEVER is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain and danger, that is to say, whatever is in any sort terrible, or is conversant about terrible objects, or operates in a manner analogous to terror, is a source of the sublime; that is, it is productive... "
Sketches from nature: taken, and coloured, in a journey to Margate ... - Page 100
by George Keate - 1790
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In Darkest Alaska: Travels and Empire Along the Inside Passage

Robert Bruce Campbell - 2007 - 348 lehte
...terror. Edmund Burke, writing at the end of the eighteenth century, identified the sublime as "whatever is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain...to terror, is a source of the sublime." "That is," Burke added, "it is productive of the strongest emotion which the mind is capable of feeling."1"5 "To...
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Représentations du corps sous l'Ancien Régime: discours et pratiques

Isabelle Billaud, Marie-Catherine Laperrière - 2007 - 287 lehte
...great power in these as in most other passions » (Edmund Burke, op. cit., p. 82). 88. « Whatever is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain,...operates in a manner analogous to terror, is a source ofthe sublime; that is, it is productive ofthe strongest emotion which the mind is capable offeeling»...
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La questione romantica. Rivista interdisciplinare di studi romantici vol. 15 ...

2007 - 256 lehte
...in any sort to excite thè ideas of pain and danger», and identified a source of thè sublime with «whatever is in any sort terrible, or is conversant...objects, or operates in a manner analogous to terror» [BURKE 1958, p. 57]. By connecting thè sublime with what is «productive of thè strongest emotion...
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Unwanted Beauty: Aesthetic Pleasure in Holocaust Representation

Brett Ashley Kaplan - 2007 - 215 lehte
...former relates to terror and the latter to love. Burke finds that "whatever is in any sort terrible, or conversant about terrible objects, or operates in a manner analogous to terror, is a source of the sublime."19 Kant was acquainted with Burke's text via a review written by Moses Mendelssohn in 1758,...
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Lady Morgan's Italy: Anglo-Irish Sensibilities and Italian Realities

Donatella Abbate Badin - 2007 - 287 lehte
...Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful (1765) affirmed that "Whatever is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain and danger, or is conversant about terrible objects, or operates in a manner analogous to terror, is a source of...
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Our Savage Neighbors: How Indian War Transformed Early America

Peter Rhoads Silver - 2008 - 406 lehte
...stunned unself-consciousness — at the heart of a fully worked-out system of aesthetics. "Whatever . . . operates in a manner analogous to terror, is a source of the sublime" Burke suggested. Since "terror is a passion which always produces delight when it does not press too...
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The Burke-Wollstonecraft Debate: Savagery, Civilization, and Democracy

Daniel I. O'Neill - 2010 - 291 lehte
...that the foundation of Burke's particular theory of sublimity is terror.13 Burke insists, "Whatever is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain, and danger," or otherwise "operates in a manner analogous to terror, is a source of the sublime; that is, it is...
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The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke

Edmund Burke - 2008 - 572 lehte
...and danger, and they are the most powerful of all the passions. SECTION VII. OF THE SUBLIME. WHATEVER is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain...that is, it is productive of the strongest emotion which the mind is capable of feeling. I say the strongest emotion, because I am satisfied the ideas...
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The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke

Edmund Burke - 2008 - 572 lehte
...danger, and they are the most powerful of all the passions. M> SECTION VII. OP THE SUBLIME. WHATEVER is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain...that is, it is productive of the strongest emotion which the mind is capable of feeling. I say the strongest emotion, because I am satisfied the ideas...
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Enlightened Republicanism: A Study of Jefferson's Notes on the State of Virginia

David Tucker - 2008 - 159 lehte
...of pleasure. Most powerful of all ideas was that of the pain of death. According to Burke, "whatever is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain and danger ... is a source of the sublime; that is, it is productive of the strongest emotion which the mind is...
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