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" WHATEVER is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain and danger, that is to say, whatever is in any sort terrible, or is conversant about terrible objects, or operates in a manner analogous to terror, is a source of the sublime; that is, it is productive... "
Sketches from nature: taken, and coloured, in a journey to Margate ... - Page 100
by George Keate - 1790
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A Philosophical Inquiry Into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and ...

Edmund Burke - 1856 - 219 lehte
...and danger, and they are the most powerful of all the passions. SECTION VII. OF THE SUBLIME. WHATEVER is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain...that is, it is productive of the strongest emotion which the mind is capable of feeling. I say the strongest emotion, because I am satisfied that the...
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The Miscellaneous Works: Poems. Miscellaneous pieces. Dramas. Criticism ...

Oliver Goldsmith - 1856
...escaped some imminent degree of danger, sufficiently indicate. Whatever excites this delight, whatever is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain and danger, without their actual existence, whatever is in any sort terrible, or is conversant about terrible objects,...
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Eclectic Magazine: Foreign Literature, 41. köide

John Holmes Agnew, Walter Hilliard Bidwell - 1857
...little suited to become the ground-work of a noble philosophy : " Whatever is fitted," says Burke, " in any sort to excite the ideas of pain and danger...that is, it is productive of the strongest emotion which the mind is capable of feeling ; I say the strongest emotion, because I am satisfied the ideas...
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, 81. köide

1857
...the groundwork of a noble philosophy : — " Whatever is fitted," says Burke, "in any sort to e*cite the ideas of pain and danger — that is to say, whatever...that is, it is productive of the strongest emotion which the mind is capable of feeling ; I say the strongest emotion, because I am satisfied the ideas...
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, 81. köide

1857
...little suited to become the groundwork of a noble philosophy : — " Whatever is fitted," says Burke, "in any sort to excite the ideas of pain and danger...any sort terrible, or is conversant about terrible objecte, or operates in в manner analogous to terror, is a source of the sublime — that ia, it is...
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The Works of Edmund Burke: With a Memoir, 1. köide

Edmund Burke - 1860
...jxrin and danger, and they are the most powerful of all the pasSECTION vn. OF THE SUBLIME. WHITBVEB, small, and that the individuals would do better to avail themselve ia to say whatever is in any sort terrihle, or is conver sain ahout terrihle ohjects, or operates in...
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The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science, and Art, 60. köide

1863
...vastness, magnitude, obscurity, infinity ; as, doubtless, they are. When, however, he says that " whatever is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain...analogous to terror, is a source of the sublime," one recognizes in part a truth, but at the same time the limitation and falsity of his definition....
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The Dublin University Magazine: A Literary and Political Journal

1863
...vustness, magnitude, obscurity, infinity; as, doubtless, they are. When, however, lie says that "whatever is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain...analogous to terror, is a source of the sublime." one recognises in part a truth, but at the stniie time the limitation and falsity of his definition....
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Dublin University Magazine, a Literary and Political Journal

George Herbert - 1863
...they are. When, however, ho says that " whatever is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of ¡mm and danger, that is to say, whatever is in any sort terrible, or is conversant about terrible -objecte, or operates in a manner analogous to terror, is a source of the sublime," one recognises...
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Works, 1. köide

Edmund Burke - 1865
...and danger, and they are the most powerful of all the passions. SECTION VII. OF THE SUBLIME. WHATEVER is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas • of pain...or operates in a manner analogous to terror, is a 1 source of the sublime ; that is, it is productive of the strongest emotion which the mind is capable...
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