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" WHATEVER is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain and danger, that is to say, whatever is in any sort terrible, or is conversant about terrible objects, or operates in a manner analogous to terror, is a source of the sublime; that is, it is productive... "
Sketches from nature: taken, and coloured, in a journey to Margate ... - Page 100
by George Keate - 1790
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The Prose of Things: Transformations of Description in the Eighteenth Century

Cynthia Wall - 2006 - 316 lehte
...Cambridge University Press, 1985), 35. 19. Edmund Burke defines the source of the sublime as "whatever is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain,...objects, or operates in a manner analogous to terror," and he specifically connects the sublime with power and the masculine, comparing our feelings toward...
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Weer siddert in mij de liefde die het lichaam sloopt: Sapphô van Lésbos ...

Jan Godderis - 2006 - 457 lehte
...Edmund Burke's beroemde definitie van de karakteristieken van het sublieme in de kunst: " Whatever is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain,...is to say, whatever is in any sort terrible, or is conuersant about terrible objects, or operates in a manner analogous to terror, is a source of the...
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The Cambridge Companion to the Irish Novel

John Wilson Foster - 2006
...Dublin: Lilliput Press, 1992. SIOBHAN KILFEATHER The Gothic novel Origins of the Gothic novel [Wjhatever is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain...that is to say, whatever is in any sort terrible, or conversant with terrible objects, or operates in a manner analogous to terror, is a source of the sublime.1...
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Realism, Representation, and the Arts in Nineteenth-Century Literature

Alison Byerly, Byerly Alison - 1997 - 231 lehte
...almost involuntarily by the spectator who absorbs its power. Burke defines the sublime as "whatever is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain,...that is to say, whatever is in any sort terrible." The mind, in contemplating such objects, responds by "claiming to itself some part of the dignity and...
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The Sublime

Philip Shaw - 2006 - 168 lehte
...sublime ('Our Ideas'), gives a clue to this new trajectory. For Burke, the 'source of the sublime' is 'whatever is in any sort terrible, or is conversant...objects, or operates in a manner analogous to terror' (Burke 1990: 36). The first part of this definition appears to confirm Burke as an advocate of the...
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The Cambridge Companion to the Irish Novel

John Wilson Foster - 2006 - 286 lehte
...the ideas of pain and danger, that is to say, whatever is in any sort terrible, or conversant with terrible objects, or operates in a manner analogous to terror, is a source of the sublime.' It is something for a man to be able to walk from his own door to his place of worship without being...
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Virtual Voyages: Cinema and Travel

Jeffrey Ruoff - 2006 - 298 lehte
...the sublime hangs heavily over Everest, defined as "whatever is fitted in any sort to excite the idea of pain, and danger, that is to say, whatever is in any sort of trouble, is conversant with terrible objects, or operates in a manner analogous to terror, is a...
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The Vision of Dante: Cary's Translation of The Divine Comedy

Edoardo Crisafulli - 2003 - 348 lehte
...mind to an aesthetic notion of the sublime in poetry that was to prove extremely influential: Whatever is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain,...that is, it is productive of the strongest emotion which the mind is capable of feeling, (ibid: 36) In Burke's aesthetics "terror" - the main source or...
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The Abject of Desire: The Aestheticization of the Unaesthetic in ...

Konstanze Kutzbach, Monika Mueller - 2007 - 309 lehte
...notion of the "terrible sublime" and stresses the significance that death has for the sublime: Whatever is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain,...that is, it is productive of the strongest emotion which the mind is capable of feeling. [...] But as pain is stronger in its operation than pleasure,...
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The Scenic Imagination: Originary Thinking from Hobbes to the Present Day

2008 - 220 lehte
...to evolutionary psychology, Burke derives the sublime from our terror of "pain and danger": Whatever is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain...that is, it is productive of the strongest emotion which the mind is capable of feeling. (I, 7) The sublime is our "strongest emotion" because we are...
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