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Raamatud Books 11 - 20 of 173 on ... the passage from the current to the needle, if not demonstrable, is thinkable,....
" ... the passage from the current to the needle, if not demonstrable, is thinkable, and that we entertain no doubt as to the final mechanical solution of the problem. But the passage from the physics of the brain to the corresponding facts of consciousness... "
Contributions to the Theory of Natural Selection: A Series of Essays - Page 367
by Alfred Russel Wallace - 1871 - 384 lehte
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SCIENTIFIC ADDRESSES

PROF. JOHN FYNDALL, - 1870
...thinkable, and that we entertain no doubt as to the final mechanical solution of the problem ; but the passage from the physics of the brain to the corresponding...us to pass by a process of reasoning from the one phenomehon to the other. They appear together, but we clo not know why. Were our minds and senses so...
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The Religious Magazine and Monthly Review, 47. köide

1872
...the two into juxtaposition" (Spencer's Psychology, p. 158, Am. Ed.). "Granted." says Prof. Tyndall, "that a definite thought and a definite molecular...us to pass by a process of reasoning from the one to the other. They appear together, but we do not know why " (Tyndall's Fragments of Science, p. 120)....
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Albany Law Journal, 63. köide

Isaac Grant Thompson - 1901
...Wundt and others, but by Spencer and Tyndall even. Kant, Spencer, du Bois-Reymond and Tyndall hold that the passage from the physics of the brain to the corresponding facts of consciousness is unthinkable. Haeckel says that when certain parts of the brain are diseased or affected, the corresponding sense...
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American Presbyterian Review

Henry Boynton Smith, James Manning Sherwood - 1871
...wide enough to require a separate volume for its proper treatment. No physiologist or philosopher lias yet ventured to propound an intelligible theory of...definite thought, and a definite molecular action of the brain occur simultaneously, we do not possess the intellectual organ, nor apparently any rndiment...
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Fragments of Science for Unscientific People: A Series of Detached Essays ...

John Tyndall - 1871
...is thinkable, and that we entertain no doubt as to the final mechanical solution of the problem. But the passage from the physics of the brain to the corresponding...us to pass, by a process of reasoning, from the one to the other. They appear together, but we do not know why. Were our minds and senses so expanded,...
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Half Hours with Modern Scientists

1871 - 288 lehte
...thinkable, and that we entertain no doubt as to the final mechanical solution of the problem ; but the passage from the physics of the brain to the corresponding...intellectual organ, nor, apparently, any rudiment of the "'hich would enable us to pass by a process f "-om the one phenomenon to the other. They appear together,...
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Fragments of Science for Unscientific People: A Series of Detached Essays ...

John Tyndall - 1871 - 422 lehte
...facts of consciousness is unthinkable, ranted that a definite thought, and a definite molecular tion in the brain occur simultaneously ; we do not possess...us to pass, by a process of reasoning, from the one to the other. They appear together, but we do not know why. Were our minds and senses so expanded,...
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The Contemporary Review, 16. köide

1871
...Association at Norwich, in 1868. The following extract will show the position then taken. He says : — " The passage from the physics of the brain to the corresponding...unthinkable. Granted that a definite thought, and the definite molecular action in the brain occur simultaneously, we do not possess the intellectual...
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All the Year Round, 6. köide;26. köide

1871
...properly asks for a little more precision. How does consciousness infuse itself into the problem ? Granted that a definite thought, and a definite molecular action in the brain, occur simultaneously, we should be as far as ever from the solution of the problem, " How are these physical processes connected...
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The Catholic Record, 1–2. köide

1871
...properly asks for a little more precision. How does consciousness infuse itself intO4 the problem ? Granted that a definite thought, and a definite molecular action in the brain, occur simultaneously, we should be as far as ever from the solution of the problem, " How are these p'.iysical processes connected...
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