This is Detroit, 1701-2001

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Wayne State University Press, 2001 - 268 pages
Arthur M. Woodford takes readers back to the days of Cadillac's settlement and leads them through Detroit's transition from French village to British fort to American town. As the city's history unfolds, he describes the issues facing its inhabitants in different eras, including westward expansion, the Civil War, the Great Depression, and two world wars. Woodford brings his history up to the present day by surveying Detroit's new cultural landscape, focusing on its current renaissance. Written in a brisk, engaging style and filled with historic illustrations and photographs, Woodford's work is an enjoyable and authoritative overview that captures the wide scope and great variety of a proud and multifaceted city. Published under the auspices of Detroit 300, this handsome volume is a highlight of the city's tricentennial celebration, presenting Detroit's best face to the world--and to the future.

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Contents

The River I
1
The First People
5
The French Village
15
The British Fort
25
The American Town
35
The Road West
47
The Civil War
63
An Industrial Center
75
The Rise of Labor
141
The Arsenal of Democracy
151
A City of Change
161
Civil Rights and Civil Strife
175
A City of Many Tongues
185
Motown
197
Tough Times
217
A New Beginning
237

The Automobile
89
World War
95
The Great Depression
115
A City of Champions
127

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About the author (2001)

Milo M. Quaife, for years secretary and editor of the Burton Historical Collection, is co-author of Michigan from Primitive Wilderness to Industrial Commonwealth; author of Lake Michigan in the Bobbs-Merrill Series on the American Lakes (of which he is general editor), founder of the Wisconsin Magazine of History, and editor of the Lakeside Classics and more than fifty volumes of American history source material.

William White, assistant professor of journalism in Wayne University and former newspaperman on The Chattanooga Times, The Los Angeles Examiner, and The Hartford Courant, has written five books and more than one hundred articles in bibliography, literature, history, and journalism.

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